We tend to think of maps as representations of geographic space. A map is a two-

We tend to think of maps as representations of geographic space. A map is a two-dimensional representation of our three-dimensional world.
A map of a place shows the relative distances (and routes) between its landmarks and topographical features. It shows them in relation to each other. But a map can represent other things, too.
At its core, a map is a visual representation of the relationships between its parts. You can map any group of things, as long as there’s some relationship between them. You can even map the stories we’ve read this semester.
You will create a map for our course, and write a 3 page justification of your map of 7+ books what we saw in the semester. Your map can take any form, as long as it represents the course in some way. It will necessarily be subjective. This is your way of making sense of the semester—your version of the world. Be creative.
Your map should show the texts we’ve read in relation to each other. How you relate them to each other is up to you. Throughout the semester, you’ve sensed various relationships between these texts. Now you have the chance to represent those relationships as you see them. For this assignment, you will map at least five of the texts we’ve read in relation to one another. Beyond that, your map can include as many texts as you want, in any combination you choose. You can map all of them, or leave some out.
Your short justification is your chance to explain how you arrived at your particular map. How did you decide to represent the texts this way? How do you see their relationships? How is your map a convincing representation of those relationships? Explain your thought process.
this is the options that you can base the map and it must be more than 7 books from there:
*The Hebrew Bible | The Garden of Eden, The Flood, and The Tower of Babel
*Mayan and West African creation myths | Popol Vuh and Anansi the Spider
*Norse mythology | The Master Builder
*The Odyssey | Book 5, Book 9, Book 12
*The Republic | The Allegory of the Cave | The City and the Philosopher King
*The Daodejing | I–VII, XVI–XX, XXV, XXVIII, XXXVII, XXXVIII, XLII, XLVIII, LXIV, LXX, LXXVI, LXXXI
* 1001 Nights | Prologue through the Fourth Night | The Fifth through the Sixteenth Nigh
*The Book of the City of Ladies | Part One, 1–19
Inferno | Canto I, III, IV, V, VI, VII, XVIII, XIX, XXI, XXVIII, XXIX, XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV
*Utopia | Book II: “The Geography of Utopia” through “Their Philosophy” | Book II: “Their Delight in Learning” through “The Religions of the Utopians”
*The Diversity of the World and Letter Concerning the First Voyage
*A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies
* The Canterbury Tales | The Miller’s Prologue and Tale
*Macbeth | Act I (Scenes 1–7), Act II (Scenes 1–4), ​Act III (Scene 1–6), Act IV (Scenes 1–3) , Act V (Scenes 1–8)

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