D‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍irections: Read the following scenario and answer the quest

D‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍irections: Read the following scenario and answer the questions which follow. Be sure to include our class readings and videos in your answers. (20 possible points) Mr. Mock teaches fifth grade. He is an experienced teacher. Mr. Mock began a recent science lesson by asking his pupils to open their textbooks to page 105, “where they left off last time.” The lesson was on photosynthesis, and was meant to help the children understand the process plants use to make food. He began by having the pupils take turns, round-robin style, reading paragraphs from the textbook. After several paragraphs had been read, he called on various students to answer questions such as, “What is the role of photosynthesis in changing sunlight energy into plant energy?” or “What is the substance that turns sunlight into energy?” Students raised their hands to answer the questions and Mr. Mock randomly called on his students, commending them for correct answers. After the class lesson was completed, Mr. Mock distributed worksheets that each pupil worked on independently at his or her own desk. On this particular worksheet, students were asked to define photosynthesis and several other terms from the chapter. Next, they were asked to list the steps in the photosynthesis process. Finally, they were allowed to share their answers with Mr. Mock, who stood in front of the class writing down correct answers on the whiteboard for the children to see. The children were asked to study their worksheets for homework and told that there would be a quiz on this material tomorrow. This concluded the lesson for the day. The next day, Mr. Mock administered the quiz. There were several questions, all very similar to the questions he had asked during yesterday’s lesson. He felt this kind of repetition was useful in the learning process. A majority of students did well on it, though as usual, several students with IEPs and limited knowledge of the English language did poorly. The quiz, much like the worksheet, asked them to define terms and to list steps in the food-making process. Mr. Mock, satisfied with the results, had the children return to their science textbooks to learn about the next topic in the chapter. The quiz, along with the other daily quizzes, provided a study guide for the upcoming chapter exam. Mr. Mock scaffolded these lessons and quizzes to prepare for the end-of-chapter test. Later in the year, the ideas of plants and food came up again. The children were on a field trip to Longwood Gardens in conjunction with a social studies unit on how cultures express themselves through art forms, such as flower arranging. A question was asked about how plants get food. The children were in general agreement that �‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍�The plant gets food from the ground through their roots.” Although this is a widely held understanding, Mr. Mock’s lesson on photosynthesis was meant to help the children understand the correct scientific conception of how plants make food. Mr. Mock’s students had done well on the photosynthesis quiz and on the end-of-chapter test. What happened? ? Please answer the following questions: QUESTION #1: Identify and briefly explain at least one effective strategy that Mr. Mock is using to teach photosynthesis and identify at least one pedagogical strategy that he is not using. (2 points) From the first paragraph, as per Bloom’s Taxonomy, what level of question is Mr. Mock asking during the lesson? What would be an example of a higher-level question? (2 points) QUESTION #2: How would Mr. Mock’s teaching work for: – English Language Learners? Please give one instance where his methods would not be effective and one instance where his methods may be effective. Your answer should address lesson planning, differentiated instruction, and grouping. (2 points) – Students with a Learning Disability? Please give one instance where his methods would not be effective and one instance where his methods may be effective. Your answer should address lesson planning, differentiated instruction, and grouping. (2 points) QUESTION #3: If you were to improve his teaching of photosynthesis, how would you use two of the educational theories that you have studied as a starting point (2 points each)? You can consider Bloom’s Taxonomy, Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, collaborative learning, Problem-Based Learning, Doug Lemov, or another technique or theory. QUESTION #4: In the Mr. Mock scenario, there is no mention of the other groups in the school setting. The Mr. Mock scenario only addresses the teacher and the students. Please address the other two major groups in the school setting, the family and the community: – How could the family support the learning process? (2 points) – How might the community support the learning process? (2 points) QUESTION #5: In the scenario, Mr. Mock has carefully laid out his lessons. He follows the textbook chapters, has the class read the material out loud, and reviews the material in class. He quizzes them almost daily. These quizzes culminate in a weekly chapter test every on Friday. He focuses on vocabulary—since he feels this is the best way to learn new concepts. He has been teaching this way for decades and believes he is doing a good job. Suggest and explain two ways (2 points each) that he could improve his teaching. This should include at least two of the following: planning, grouping, execution of the lesson or formative (ong‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍oing) assessment (2 points each).

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